PrEP makes you more promiscuous

In other countries like the United States, where Prep is more commonly used, there are discussions where men have identified feeling “slut shamed” by other gay men who judge their decision to use PrEP.

Many feelings around shame and stigma related to sex are nothing new. In the event that these feelings get you down, you can always get support either through your doctor or other support networks.

Most studies have shown no big shifts in numbers of sexual partners.

Using PrEP is not being responsible

Using PrEP for the prevention of HIV transmission is in fact being very responsible. Studies continue to show very high levels of  protection from HIV when PrEP is adhered to as prescribed by your doctor. HIV experts suggest that if used correctly, PrEP can offer up to 99% protection from HIV.

PrEP however does not protect you from other STIs. Many guys who use PrEP choose to also use condoms for added protection.

Using PrEP means increases in other STIs

The information from overseas studies on this provides mixed information. While the San Francisco study identified that STI transmissions amongst participants were a cause for concern, and highlighted the need for screening and treatment for STIs, it was also argued that the regular follow up treatment for PrEP users may have in fact facilitated earlier diagnosis and treatment of STIs.

The relationship with your doctor whilst using PrEP will mean that you will be monitored more closely for all STIs. In most cases when STIs are diagnosed early, they can be successfully treated early.

Side Effects

When using PrEP you may experience the following side effects including; headache, vomiting, diarrhoea, loss of appetite, stomach upset, gassiness.

Often guys who are using PrEP report little or no side effects from PrEP medication.

If side effects do not go away or become severe please notify your doctor.

What is this I hear about Injecting PrEP? Is this currently available?

Current research is being conducted to produce a monthly form of injectable PrEP which would offer protection for approximately 30 days.

More research needs to be conducted before an injectable form of PrEP will become available. This form of HIV protection is not expected to be available any time soon.